Mobile app accessibility roundup for June 15, 2020

author
Doug Stevenson
Director of Developer Relations at Mesmer (mesmerhq.com)
June 14, 2020
Mesmer article

In this edition of our mobile accessibility roundup, we have some tips from the BBC, a call for more accessibility in health care apps, and a huge upgrade to Google’s Voice Access in Android 11.

8 tips to guide accessibility in apps and games

Accessibility is often left as an afterthought during the design and development phases of mobile apps. This just doesn’t work — it needs to be taken into account from the beginning in order to make sure all are included. Read these tips about how the BBC organizes their efforts for their apps.

Title: Building apps for everyone: discover why inclusivity and accessibility truly matter Authors: Ceri Lindsay & Rosalind Whittam Published on: May 27, 2020

COVID-19 makes mobile app accessibility more important than ever

In this article, Sheri breaks down some possible functions of a contact tracing app, and illustrates how if any of its functions are not accessible, then the entire app is completely unusable. Software for used in emergencies must absolutely be accessible in order to be of service to the most vulnerable populations.

Title: Why COVID-19 contact tracing apps *must* be accessible Published on: May 27, 2020 Author: Sheri Byrne-Haber Note: Also posted behind the Medium paywall

Voice Access gets a big upgrade in Android 11

Android’s Voice Access is designed to make mobile devices generally more easy to use for those who have difficulty touching their devices. With Android 11, now in beta, can understand and speak what’s on screen, provide context, and receive voice controls to interact with that content.

Title: Unwrapping the Android 11 Beta, plus more developer updates Published on: June 10, 2020 Author: Stephanie Cuthbertson

Be sure to watch this inspiring video demo by Dieter Bohn on Twitter here.

About Mesmer

Mesmer, the leader in Robotics Process Automation for Development (RPAD), is radically changing the way developers work. Mesmer’s AI-powered bots use patent-pending Deep Learning Automation (DLA™) to accelerate every function of customer experience testing. This means means crazy fast releases, better apps, and happier employees. Mesmer is headquartered in Palo Alto, California, and funded by Intel Capital and True Ventures.


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